Jan 8

So, I’ve changed my Firefox setup quite a bit over the last months. I now work with multiple profiles, e.g. one for online banking, one for social media use and one for development purposes and one for “default” use (i.e. pretty much else). I’m quite happy with the experience.

Usually I have all three profiles running in parallel, showing on different virtual desktops of my linux box. I.e., on desktop 2, I usually have my development environment open, so I’ll open the “development” browser there, desktop 4 runs all the applications for interacting with other people (mail etc.), so “social” goes there and the default one will show on virtual desktop 5.

Why would you do this?

One direct effect is that the amount of open tabs in any given browser window is a lot smaller and also better grouped than before. I.e., any web page I need for my current development project I will only open in my “development” profile. I will only open my bank’s page in the banking profile, so this browser window will never show anything else.

The other main benefit is that I can have profile specific configurations. E.g., I nail down my “default” profile with NoScript which is not really useful on my “development” profile, whereas I don’t need e.g. the React Dev tools on the “social” or “default” profile.

Dedicated profiles can also help with security, e.g., using a dedicated profile can lower the attack surface for online banking: When you don’t browse to other sites with the same browser/profile, any XSS/CSRF issue on these “other” sites for sure can’t affect your online banking connection.

The profile I use exclusively for online banking is also highly locked down and in addition uses a different theme, so that it is visually obvious that I’m working with this profile.

Get me started, please

To start using multiple profiles, you have to run Firefox with the -P switch, which will start the Profile Manager that allows you to create new profiles, delete profiles etc. Alternatively, if you have Firefox already running, browsing to about:profiles will also allow you to manage your profiles.

For a while, I just started the non-default browsers manually over the command line, by just opening an xterm and running firefox --no-remote -P social &. But I finally created some additional local .desktop files (cf. the Arch wiki page on xdg desktop files), so I can start Firefox from the desktop. I.e., I added a file $HOME/.local/share/applications/socialbrowser-usercreated.desktop with the following content:

[Desktop Entry]
Name=Social Firefox
Comment=Browse the World Wide Web
Comment[de]=Im Internet surfen
Exec=/usr/lib/firefox-esr/firefox-esr --no-remote -P social %u
Terminal=false
X-MultipleArgs=false
Type=Application
Icon=firefox-esr
Categories=Network;WebBrowser;
MimeType=text/html;text/xml;application/xhtml+xml;application/xml;application/vnd.mozilla.xul+xml;application/rss+xml;application/rdf+xml;image/gif;image/jpeg;image/png;x-scheme-handler/http;x-scheme-handler/https;
StartupWMClass=Firefox-social
StartupNotify=true

This will then create a menu entry in the “Internet” submenu in my application starter menu in my desktop environment (because that’s where the given categories will create entries).

Any drawbacks?

One annoying thing is the profile selection that Firefox pops up when you don’t specify a profile on the command line. If you select the option “Use the selected profile without asking at startup”, then it will not be easy anymore to use a different profile — the only way then is really to use -P again.

This default profile selection becomes a problem especially when you want to open a link from a different application (eg. from your mail program), because then you can’t decide which of the running browsers/profiles will open the link, it will always try to use the default one. I have seen varying behavior what Firefox does when you don’t select a default profile: sometimes it just picks one running profile successfully, but I’ve also seen it opening the profile selection dialog again. In that case, if you select a profile that is already in use, Firefox will handle it like an attempt to open up the profile a second time, resulting in an error. My current workaround to this particular issue is to set the default browser to Chromium via xdg-settings set default-web-browser chromium.desktop.

The other hassle working with multiple profiles is bookmark management, as I want some bookmarks only local to one profile but most should be shared. I can use Pocket for the shared ones, of course. However, I often just copy&paste the URL manually to the “default” browser which serves as the main bookmark keeper. I really should move away from this completely and instead use the bookmark extension of my Nextcloud installation.

Overall, for me the benefits clearly outweigh any drawbacks.

Posted by Holger Schauer

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